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EVENT PARTNERS

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The Centre for Positive Psychology brings the world to Melbourne

The World Congress will be held outside of North America for the first time. 

Don't miss world leaders of Positive Psychology presenting their world class research. As the premier Event Partner we look forward to seeing you there!

Register Here

VIP EVENTS SPONSORED BY The CENTRE FOR POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

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WEDNESDAY 17 JULY, 5.15PM

MELBOURNE UNIVERSITY

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THURSDAY 18 JULY, 7PM

EXHIBIT HALL, MCEC

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FRIDAY  19TH JULY, 7AM

EXHIBIT HALL LOUNGE, MCEC

Click to Register


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FRIDAY 19 JULY, 7.30PM

GARDEN ROOM, CROWN TOWERS

Click to Register


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SATURDAY 20 JULY, 7PM

MELBOURNE ROOM, MCEC

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THURSDAY 18 - SUNDAY 21 JULY

EXHIBIT HALL, MCEC


VISIT OUR EXPO STAND AND SEE OUR LATEST RESEARCH IN ACTION

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WELLBEING PROFILER

     

The Wellbeing Profiler is an innovative analytical report that measures and evaluates youth wellbeing for schools, councils and communities enabling effective planning and use of resources to meet the current and future needs of youth. 

Find out more
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BIODASH

     

BIO-DASH is an innovative optimal performance and well-being program that equips your child with strategies to focus, manage stress, and reduce anxiety using biofeedback devices and gaming features. 

Find out more

DON't MISS OUT

EXCITING BOOK LAUNCH

CPP SPEAKERS

Thursday 18 July

IPPA Wellbeing Adventure Race Around Melbourne

1pm - 5pm

MCEC

+ Event Details

Thursday 18 July

IPPA Wellbeing Adventure Race Around Melbourne

Associate Professor Aaron Jarden, Dr. Jo Mitchell & Dr. Suzy Green

Join all the cool people for an amazing afternoon of wellbeing skill building and adventuring around Melbourne. Aaron, Jo, and Suzy will make experiential learning fun, and you will take away at least half a dozen new skills that you can use immediately to increase your powers of connection at the Congress. This adventure is ideal for individuals coming alone to the   congress so they can connect with others (you will be based in teams for the race), individuals relatively new to positive psychology so they can connect with positive psychology and experience it, and individuals new to Melbourne and Australia so they can connect with an Australian and Melbourne way of   life. Also, running is frowned upon during the race and you risk small children mocking you for a considerable amount of time…   

1pm - 5pm

MCEC

Thursday 18 JULY

The Intersection of Big Data and Positive Psychology Research

9am - 5:30pm

Meeting Room 218, MCEC

+ Event Details

Thursday 18 JULY

The Intersection of Big Data and Positive Psychology Research

Associate Professor Peggy Kern

The 21st century has brought a data rich age, with online technologies   intersecting with and impacting upon nearly every area of human life.   Combined with a growing range of methodologies now available, opportunities abound for using big data within positive psychology research and application. What can big data reveal? Will big data replace self-report measures, allowing cost-effective, real-time, ecologically valid tracking of wellbeing across entire populations? Can big data be used to personalize and improve interventions? Can machine learning techniques be applied to others types of data? Using linguistic data as an example, this talk will illustrate probable applications of big data and machine learning within positive psychology research, based on current capabilities, what may be possible in the near future as computer science and positive psychology intersect, and problematic aspects that emphasize the need for research with and applications of big data to proceed cautiously.     


9am - 5:30pm

Meeting Room 218, MCEC

Friday 19 July

The Strategic Use of Wellbeing Measurement to Promote Thriving

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 211, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

The Strategic Use of Wellbeing Measurement to Promote Thriving

Associate Professor Peggy Kern

Insights from the PERMAH Workplace Survey.

Measurement plays an important role in understanding employee wellbeing, monitoring changes over time, and determining the effectiveness of programs and practices. A growing range of tools are available. The PERMAH Workplace Survey is one such tool, which helps individuals and organisations understand and take actions to improve their wellbeing.

Variants of the measure have been developed and tested with hundreds of thousands of people from around the world. Putting the research into practice, the workplace version is freely available online; individuals can take the measure, learn about their wellbeing, access a database of evidence-informed activities to build PERMAH, and be guided through a process to proactively manage their own mental health. Using the practice to inform research, we have trialed additional questions, providing fascinating insights for wellbeing theory, such as what happens when you take a collective approach to defining wellbeing.

Yet any single measure is limited in numerous ways. Wellbeing measurement must be approached with care, or risk doing more harm than good. This talk offers the latest results and insights from measuring PERMAH in workplaces, illustrating how nuanced approaches to measurement can lead to more targeted ways of helping individuals, teams, and organisations thrive.

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 211, MCEC

Friday 19 JULY

Ethical Guidelines for Positive Psychology Practitioners

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 209, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 JULY

Ethical Guidelines for Positive Psychology Practitioners

Associate Professor Aaron Jarden    

Positive psychology is beginning to function as a distinct discipline, with   people/professionals self-identifying as “positive psychologists.” Thus, this   conversation hour explores a set of professional (e.g., ethical) guidelines   to inform the practice of positive psychology. These guidelines cover aspects such as who has the ‘right’ to practice positive psychology, and how best practice can be supported and upheld. Throughout we focus specifically on the development of ethical protocols, drawing on guidelines in counselling, coaching, health related fields, and psychotherapy. This conversation hour   will be used as a starting point for a discussion, in which the various panel   members – which together have a range of perspectives on the issues in question – can debate/discuss these timely and important issues. After presentation of the guidelines, the discussion shall also be opened up, allowing for questions, and interaction with the audience. As such, we hope that the discussion hour as a whole integrates numerous perspectives and advance discourse within the field around issue of ethical practice of positive psychology, thus helping positive psychology to develop further over the years ahead.   

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 209, MCEC

Friday 19 July

Big Data Meets Long Data: The Predictive Power of Childhood Essays Across Five Decades

2pm - 3pm

Meeting Room 219, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

Big Data Meets Long Data: The Predictive Power of Childhood Essays Across Five Decades

Associate Professor Peggy Kern 

The World Well-Being Project has developed a range of methods for working with linguistic information available through social media, which has resulted in numerous intriguing insights as psychological phenomena are studied at scale. Such studies have tested very large numbers cross-sectionally or across short time periods. Could similar techniques be used to study people over long time periods?

The National Child Development Study is a UK based study that has followed a cohort of over 17,000 individuals prospectively across their lives, with 9 measurement occasions extending from birth through age 55. At age 11, children wrote essays describing their imagined life at age 25. Combining this large nationally representative sample, the essays written in childhood, and machine learning techniques, we examined the value of linguistic information in understanding lifespan development at large scale. We transcribed about 10,500 essays, extracted numerous linguistic features, and examined how well we could predict 4 outcomes (subjective and objective physical and mental health, physical activity, social mobility, and cognitive functioning), measured across 5 decades.

The results illustrate potentials for and challenges of combining interdisciplinary research, multiple types of data, and big data approaches. 

2pm - 3pm

Meeting Room 219, MCEC

More Events

CPP Poster Talks

Thursday 18 July

IPPA Wellbeing Adventure Race Around Melbourne

1pm - 5pm

MCEC

+ Event Details

Thursday 18 July

IPPA Wellbeing Adventure Race Around Melbourne

Dr. Aaron Jarden, Jo Mitchell & Suzy Green

Join all the cool people for an amazing afternoon of wellbeing skill building and adventuring around Melbourne. Aaron, Jo, and Suzy will make experiential learning fun, and you will take away at least half a dozen new skills that you can use immediately to increase your powers of connection at the Congress. This adventure is ideal for individuals coming alone to the   congress so they can connect with others (you will be based in teams for the race), individuals relatively new to positive psychology so they can connect with positive psychology and experience it, and individuals new to Melbourne and Australia so they can connect with an Australian and Melbourne way of   life. Also, running is frowned upon during the race and you risk small children mocking you for a considerable amount of time…   

1pm - 5pm

MCEC

Thursday 18 JULY

The Intersection of Big Data and Positive Psychology Research

9am - 5:30pm

Meeting Room 218, MCEC

+ Event Details

Thursday 18 JULY

The Intersection of Big Data and Positive Psychology Research

Associate Professor Peggy Kern

The 21st century has brought a data rich age, with online technologies   intersecting with and impacting upon nearly every area of human life.   Combined with a growing range of methodologies now available, opportunities abound for using big data within positive psychology research and application. What can big data reveal? Will big data replace self-report measures, allowing cost-effective, real-time, ecologically valid tracking of wellbeing across entire populations? Can big data be used to personalize and improve interventions? Can machine learning techniques be applied to others types of data? Using linguistic data as an example, this talk will illustrate probable applications of big data and machine learning within positive psychology research, based on current capabilities, what may be possible in the near future as computer science and positive psychology intersect, and problematic aspects that emphasize the need for research with and applications of big data to proceed cautiously.     


9am - 5:30pm

Meeting Room 218, MCEC

Friday 19 July

The Strategic Use of Wellbeing Measurement to Promote Thriving

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 211, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

The Strategic Use of Wellbeing Measurement to Promote Thriving

Associate Professor Peggy Kern

Insights from the PERMAH Workplace Survey.

Measurement plays an important role in understanding employee wellbeing, monitoring changes over time, and determining the effectiveness of programs and practices. A growing range of tools are available. The PERMAH Workplace Survey is one such tool, which helps individuals and organisations understand and take actions to improve their wellbeing.

Variants of the measure have been developed and tested with hundreds of thousands of people from around the world. Putting the research into practice, the workplace version is freely available online; individuals can take the measure, learn about their wellbeing, access a database of evidence-informed activities to build PERMAH, and be guided through a process to proactively manage their own mental health. Using the practice to inform research, we have trialed additional questions, providing fascinating insights for wellbeing theory, such as what happens when you take a collective approach to defining wellbeing.

Yet any single measure is limited in numerous ways. Wellbeing measurement must be approached with care, or risk doing more harm than good. This talk offers the latest results and insights from measuring PERMAH in workplaces, illustrating how nuanced approaches to measurement can lead to more targeted ways of helping individuals, teams, and organisations thrive.

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 211, MCEC

Friday 19 JULY

Ethical Guidelines for Positive Psychology Practitioners

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 209, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 JULY

Ethical Guidelines for Positive Psychology Practitioners

Dr. Aaron Jarden    

Positive psychology is beginning to function as a distinct discipline, with   people/professionals self-identifying as “positive psychologists.” Thus, this   conversation hour explores a set of professional (e.g., ethical) guidelines   to inform the practice of positive psychology. These guidelines cover aspects such as who has the ‘right’ to practice positive psychology, and how best practice can be supported and upheld. Throughout we focus specifically on the development of ethical protocols, drawing on guidelines in counselling, coaching, health related fields, and psychotherapy. This conversation hour   will be used as a starting point for a discussion, in which the various panel   members – which together have a range of perspectives on the issues in question – can debate/discuss these timely and important issues. After presentation of the guidelines, the discussion shall also be opened up, allowing for questions, and interaction with the audience. As such, we hope that the discussion hour as a whole integrates numerous perspectives and advance discourse within the field around issue of ethical practice of positive psychology, thus helping positive psychology to develop further over the years ahead.   

9:15am - 10:15am

Meeting Room 209, MCEC

Friday 19 July

Big Data Meets Long Data: The Predictive Power of Childhood Essays Across Five Decades

2pm - 3pm

Meeting Room 219, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

Big Data Meets Long Data: The Predictive Power of Childhood Essays Across Five Decades

Associate Professor Peggy Kern 

The World Well-Being Project has developed a range of methods for working with linguistic information available through social media, which has resulted in numerous intriguing insights as psychological phenomena are studied at scale. Such studies have tested very large numbers cross-sectionally or across short time periods. Could similar techniques be used to study people over long time periods?

The National Child Development Study is a UK based study that has followed a cohort of over 17,000 individuals prospectively across their lives, with 9 measurement occasions extending from birth through age 55. At age 11, children wrote essays describing their imagined life at age 25. Combining this large nationally representative sample, the essays written in childhood, and machine learning techniques, we examined the value of linguistic information in understanding lifespan development at large scale. We transcribed about 10,500 essays, extracted numerous linguistic features, and examined how well we could predict 4 outcomes (subjective and objective physical and mental health, physical activity, social mobility, and cognitive functioning), measured across 5 decades.

The results illustrate potentials for and challenges of combining interdisciplinary research, multiple types of data, and big data approaches. 

2pm - 3pm

Meeting Room 219, MCEC

More Events

MAPP ALUMNI

Friday 19 July

What is the place of mindfulness and contemplative practices in learning and teaching?

2pm-3pm

Meeting Room 216, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

What is the place of mindfulness and contemplative practices in learning and teaching?

Narelle Lemon (Swinburne/MAPP) (Chair) Rosey Chang (Monash) Siobhan O’Brien (Swinburne) Brad Elphinstone (Swinburne)

The place of mindfulness and contemplative practices in learning and teaching is growing. We see examples of mindfulness curriculum emerging (e.g.: Kidsmatter, 2018; Mindful Meditation Australia, 2018; OECD, 2018; Smiling Mind, 2018), mindfulness and meditation professional development for university students (e.g.: Dundas et al. 2016; Semple et al., 2017; University of Sydney, 2018; University of California—Los Angeles, 2018; UC San Diego Center for Mindfulness, 2018), formally within degrees (e.g.: University of Tasmania, 2017), through programs located within subjects to prepare pre-service teachers (Hartigan, 2017), and in supporting teachers in relation to mentoring (Trube, 2017), their role as teachers (Grant, 2017; Langer, 1989), in becoming a teacher (Berney, 2014; Kostanski, 2007; Lemon & McDonough, 2018), and in education leadership (Wells, 2015).  As interest develops in what this approach to wellbeing can offer in education, this session discusses research and practice carried out over a variety of education contexts (F-12 and Higher Education) to further contribute to the discussion.  We note shifts in teaching practice, identity, awareness within the classroom, and how this can contribute to the lives of teachers. Through a facilitated panel conversation we respond to the question: What can mindfulness offer students and teachers?

2pm-3pm

Meeting Room 216, MCEC

Saturday 20 July

A pilot of the Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) program in undergraduate students

3pm-4pm

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+ Event Details

Saturday 20 July

A pilot of the Compassion Cultivation Training (CCT) program in undergraduate students

Jason Mills (QUT) and Berni Cooper (QUT)

Compassion represents both a strength of character and the virtue of humanity. As a positive emotion, it is also associated with leadership capability, psychological flexibility, physical health and wellbeing. While there is increasing interest in the promotion of prosocial behaviour linked with compassion, the reporting of compassion-based training interventions is surprisingly limited. This presentation reports the implementation of a positive education project in an Australian university, encompassing delivery of a compassion cultivation training (CCT) program developed at Stanford University. As an eight-week course designed to develop compassion, empathy, and kindness for oneself and others, CCT draws upon mindfulness techniques, loving-kindness meditation and real-world exercises for students to apply outside the classroom setting. We report here the evaluation findings in relation to feasibility and acceptability of this intervention in a sample of undergraduate students participating in a co-curricular leadership development and innovation program. Outcome measures pre and post intervention include validated compassion and self-compassion scales. In this presentation we discuss the implications of our findings to further build positive education practice. Consistent with the notion of moving towards a positive university, we also consider the potential application of compassion-based training for staff. 

3pm-4pm

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Saturday 20 July

Wellbeing, Meaning and Time spent with children: the case of Part-Time Working Fathers

3pm-4pm

Exhibition Bay 15&16

+ Event Details

Saturday 20 July

Wellbeing, Meaning and Time spent with children: the case of Part-Time Working Fathers

Eric Mercier (MAPP 2018/ PhD student University of Adelaide)

There is a need for researchers to investigate the wellbeing of an under-researched group, part-time working fathers, as there is current a gap in the literature on this population. There is abundant literature on fatherhood, masculinity, fathers’ involvement in family/children life, impact of fathers’ involvement with their children. However, there is no specific literature on part-time working fathers’ wellbeing in relation to time spent with children. It is suggested that a research should compare part-time working fathers to full-time working fathers and explore the correlation between wellbeing (supported by Ryff’s Psychological Wellbeing Scale or the PERMA Profiler), meaning, time spent with children and family to work enrichment, supported by the Work-Family Enrichment scale. It is suggested that a longitudinal mixed methods study be implemented, including two concurrent quantitative questionnaires and one qualitative survey to participants at one-month intervals. It is expected that the research will find positive correlations between the variables for part-time working fathers, help stimulate the literature, promote/raise awareness of the need for fathers to catch up to mothers regarding part-time work and create more debate about the obsolescence of the father-as-primary-breadwinner model, which is still currently the prevalent model around the world.

3pm-4pm

Exhibition Bay 15&16

Friday 19 July

Cultivating the under-appreciated virtue of Gratitude in the workplace

3pm-4pm

Exhibition Bay 15&16

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

Cultivating the under-appreciated virtue of Gratitude in the workplace

Michel Gomberg (MAPP 2018)

Literature supports gratitude as a key driver for life and job satisfaction, pro-social behaviour, wellbeing and organisational resilience. Nevertheless, few studies on gratitude in the organisational environment have been conducted. This case study presents a gratitude intervention aimed at creating trust and a sense of belonging within a team of 16 employees at a large company in the beverage segment. Participants were encouraged to create their own timeline of relevant professional memories, placing pleasant ones above a line and painful ones below. Next, they reflected on the learnings that emerged from those peaks and valleys and shared their insights with the group. Qualitative participant feedback indicated that knowing others’ life journeys instilled a more appreciative and empathetic look that generated team cohesion. There was also a sense of healing fuelled by the opportunity to make peace with the past. Most employees felt strengthened, energised and better equipped for the challenges ahead. Results indicate that this method has potential to elevate individual consciousness and build a solid team bond through shared meaningful narratives. Therefore corporations aiming to become positive institutions should start considering gratitude as a desired organisational behaviour rather than just a personal virtue suitable for private domains.

3pm-4pm

Exhibition Bay 15&16

Saturday 20 July

HQCCoP - The virtual high-quality connection community of practice

3pm - 4pm

Exhibition Bay 15&16

+ Event Details

Saturday 20 July

HQCCoP - The virtual high-quality connection community of practice

Marcia Ryan (MAPP 2016)

Globally connecting academics, practitioners and the general public online to make HQCs a reality across communities (58037).

HQCCoP – The high-quality connections community of practice is an online community focussing on ways to best apply and put into action high-quality connections (HQCs) theory. It was established in May 2017 and founded by Marcia Ryan, Wellbeing Works, Australia, Mary Ceccanese, University of Michigan, USA with advisory support from Jane Dutton, University of Michigan, USA. It provides an online platform for members to connect with others who are passionate about learning more about high-quality connections (HQCs) and share practical ways to apply this theory into the work we do and relationships we have. This community share experiences, participate in online discussions, share new learning, offer support and provides a way to seek help and best practice ideas from the community for applying and implementing HQC practices in organisations, schools, homes and communities.With over 300 members from around the globe, HQCCoP connects researchers, academics, leaders and everyday people seeking ways to build HQCs and help others make them a reality in their daily interactions. HQCCoP encourages ongoing dialogue and creates a supportive online space for sharing and celebrating the application of theory in practical ways across different countries and communities. HQC community conversations continue to happen at https//www.facebook.com/groups/HQCCOP/

3pm - 4pm

Exhibition Bay 15&16

More Events

Official Events

Thursday 18 July

Opening Congress Party

7pm

Exhibit Hall, MCEC

+ Event Details

Thursday 18 July

Opening Congress Party

Sponsored by Centre of Positive Psychology 

7pm

Exhibit Hall, MCEC

Friday 19 July

MAPP saa Breakfast

7:30am - 9am

Exhibit Hall Lounge, MCEC

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

MAPP saa Breakfast

Sponsored by Centre of Positive Psychology 

7:30am - 9am

Exhibit Hall Lounge, MCEC

Friday 19 July

CPP Positive Leadership Dinner

7pm - 10pm

Garden Room, Crown Towers

+ Event Details

Friday 19 July

CPP Positive Leadership Dinner

Sponsored by Centre of Positive Psychology 

7pm - 10pm

Garden Room, Crown Towers

Saturday 20 July

Congress Gala Dinner

7pm - 10pm

Melbourne Room, MCEC

+ Event Details

Saturday 20 July

Congress Gala Dinner

Sponsored by Centre of Positive Psychology 

7pm - 10pm

Melbourne Room, MCEC

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